Tag: social networking

Plan for the down time

Why not make an action plan now of the five things you are going to tackle with your brand and marketing this summer?

These often discussed tasks keep getting pushed to the bottom of your to-do list. Set aside time now with specific dates for each task and spend a day planning each of them. Treat yourself to a nice lunch and have ‘a date’ with your ‘to dos’ and turn them into ‘dones’.

Our recommendations – although somewhat broad and of course non-specific to your cause and charity – would be the following:

 

1. Take a day to review each of your audience types. You should have personas for each type of person and user journeys as to how they interact and when you can prompt them to support you. Do you need to look in more detail about each of your segments? Six advantages of segmentation: Focus of the company / Increase in competitiveness / Market expansion / Customer retention / Have better communication / Increases profitability (marketing91.com)

 

2. Is your digital estate reflective of how people have or would like to interact with you? Do a social audit and write a social media strategy. 80% of social media users prefer to connect with brands through Facebook (Business2community)

 

3. How is my money spent? This is the biggest question current and potential supporters, from your experience, want to know the answer to. Is your charity explaining clearly how each pound is spent to them? What are the impacts and link this to numbers and quantities that are realistic and meaningful i.e. ‘the same as the UK population” and  “the time it takes to make a piece of toast” work because they are easily understood and have a relevant context

 Why not write-up meaningful case studies that demonstrate your work.

 

4. What is today’s brand story? Stooped in myths and no-doubt your organisation has a long history.  People like to read about real people doing real projects, so bring alive the breath-and-depth of your organisation’s history i.e “delivering for the environment for the last 60 years” with the latest projects “here’s our snow leopard live tracking with Hans and his team…”

 

5. Use film. Make your story comes alive in 30 seconds; do have a three minute version (and a ten minute one too for potential partner meetings). About 46% of people say they’d be more likely to seek out information about a product or service after seeing it in an online video and it is the 6th most popular marketing content today (blog-eloqua.com)

 

In the days and weeks ahead, use the summer quiet period to make a difference. We could do the heavy lifting for you and deliver some of the above and help you tick off your to do list, before going back to school.

 

Five ways to increase your influence with social media

Social media
Social media has become a far more prominent and important part of most people’s lives than we could have predicted.

“If you make customers unhappy in the physical world, they might each tell six friends. If you make customers unhappy on the internet, they can each tell 6,000 friends”

Jeff Bezos, CEO at Amazon

Social media began almost a decade ago but it’s become a far more prominent and important part of most people’s lives than we could have predicted. It has become a more advanced version of the classic word-of-mouth – and companies try to use it as such.

Here are five tips to help increase your influence through social media platforms.

1. Know your online presence

Nowadays, almost all groups, charities, companies and individuals are running a social platform (or they should be). However, to make the most of your online presence, you need to be able to answer three fundamental questions:

  • What is my online presence? For instance, we’ve had clients not knowing about multiple Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook feeds, working inconsistently with different messages
  • Which social platforms best fit my supporter /audience base? For instance, Vine, the six second video sharing site, lends itself very well to WWF’s endangered species programme, but is perhaps less effective for the Samaritans’ support work
  • How are we measuring our influence online? Are we plotting and measuring where people go on our site, who is re-tweeting and what number of comments are we getting on our posts? (and, more importantly, how many people has this been fed on to)? Most platforms offer tools to measure how many times your pages or posts have been seen, the number of clicks per minute you’ve received, what content is the most appreciated (liked) by viewers, and so on.

2. Understand the best way to influence key audiences

Once you have found what is the best platform to reach your target audience, you need to find the best way to influence them through this channel. Should we produce posts, videos, photos and engage our target audience with games, petitions, actions, competitions etc? Keep them informed of how many actions and time spent equates to a certain level of influence. Amnesty do this really well, explaining that in 5 minutes you could sign a petition, with half a day’s support, you could attend a rally.

3. Produce shareable content – and make it easy to do so!

Most social platforms allow for the sharing of content so it is easy to engage with campaign videos, infographics, viral, posters, etc. in this most popular way. As stand out is tough on social platforms, all your creative talents should be focused on producing relevant photos to promote your posts and increase sharing opportunities. Make sure your content is not too heavy and long, and that people can quickly understand and share with their comments (and ownership). Heck, why not write a shareable chunk of text to go with posts, 140 word re-tweet friendly.

4. Consistent and flowing campaigns – don’t start and stop.

When you start being present on a social, make sure you keep your audience engaged by regularly posting information (at least twice a week). Show off past projects and successes, the difference you’ve made so far, your ‘storyboard’ or your personality – by interacting in this way, you will build engaged audiences. Keep you audience up to date. But don’t bore them.

5. Finally, let others do the heavy lifting!

Relevant partners will happily use your content, so build your campaign and change strategy with this in mind. You may well be the trusted partner in this programme and you can make use of networks, which may well quickly get to 1.5million people – if you are working with O2 Priority Moments, for instance. This is well worth doing if it can build support and engagement in a meaningful and relevant way.

Some of the best charities and environment social campaign from the last year include:

Campaign “Touch Yourself” for Breast Cancer Awareness

Touch Yourself
The campaign aimed to promote early cancer detection through self-checks for breast lumps.

The campaign launched in October 2012 by F Cancer and Women’s Health and Men’s Health magazines, aimed to promote early cancer detection through self-checks for breast lumps. A Facebook app was created to pledge to perform a self-check and share a variety of 14 pre-written postcards with friends, encouraging them to do the same.

This is the king of campaigns, a perfect example of how to use of social channels. Facebook was the main channel, with sharable content engaging the target audience and ways to encourage friends to do the same.

Campaign Twestival for Charity: Water

Twestival
Twestival aimed toto bring Twitter communities together to raise money for Charity: Water

“On 12 February 2009, 200+ international cities hosted a Twestival (Twitter + festival) to bring Twitter communities together to raise money for Charity: Water”. One week later the charity water staff flew to Ethiopia to drill the first well.

They immediately posted videos on Twitter related to their work, with some “re-tweetable“ information about water conditions, and published funds raised for each city. The Twitter activity allowed communities to engage, raise £174,899 funds for water projects, to build 55 wells, to serve water to over 17,000 people, and also to allow followers to see the day to day activity.

 

 

Now the party is over

We’ve had the party of the century- a great atmosphere with The Games, the Diamond Jubilee and 70,000 Gamemakers reminding us what is important. Now is an opportunity to get your house in order – a fresh start with a bit of an autumn spring clean on the back of everyone feeling so positive.  There are ten things we think you could do which could add value to your organisation and help the business grow in ways not only relevant to our clients (charities, sustainable caring companies and education based orgs) – but to others too. Why not:-

1.  Have your own Gamemakers plan – take on teams of passionate people who care about your cause

2. Do a social audit of all those twitter accounts that have crept up; who are they for and are they of any value? Write a social media policy (who are your main bloggers, are they on message, what’s the back up for them?)

3. Fill in the gaps in your database and ring up lapsed supporters

4. Organise that ‘getting to know us day’ for supporters to hear about your future work and the value they bring

5. Get new blood on the board – draw up a short list of new skills you need from Trustees

6. Be at the right events with a plan of all the best ‘Free events’

7. Write up your case studies – like agencies do – of all your great work and put it online

8. Produce a 30 mins film about your organisation and post online

9. Look at who the organisation has partnered throughout its life; get back in touch with old friends

10. Make sure all staff have a campaigning and promotions element to their job.

In the happy days and weeks after the great summer – make some progress on those often discussed tasks. Or at least let Green Banana Marketing help with the ones that drop off your list.