Smarter Greener Fairer

Blog

Shortcuts Stand out from the crowd – need to know brand and marketing essentials

 

Your invitation to Green Banana Marketing’s next Shortcuts event
View this email in your browser

Shortcuts Series

Standout from the crowd – need to know brand and marketing essentials

Free Shortcuts seminar – Tuesday 10th September 2015 9 – 10am

Green Banana Marketing invite you to their free Charity Shortcuts seminar on Tuesday 10 September 2015 at 9am.

Charities need good marketing more than ever – with great pressures to gain new supporters (and more charities to standout from), building your appeal and what you stand for is essential.

Having a strong brand and marketing focus has never mattered more.

This innovative hours workshop will change the way you think about marketing and leave you bursting with ideas on how to build your brand personality, standout from the crowd and attract new supporters to your organisation.

Previous delegates said of the seminar; “very useful and inspiring – the fundamentals of marketing”

     

We would very much like to see you and a colleague at this Free Shortcuts seminar on Tuesday 10th September 2015 at 9am for one hour at the O2 Workshop, 229 Tottenham Court Road, London, W1T7QG.

Places are limited to 20, so please do click here now to subscribe and book your free place.



‘Shortcuts’ seminars are intended to give you the most important information in the one-hour session. Drinks, cakes and a friendly networking session will follow the seminar. 



We look forward to seeing you there!

Kind regards,

Follow us on Twitter
Visit our website
BOOK NOW
Date: 10th September 2015Time:

9 – 10 am

Location:

02 Workshop

229 Tottenham Court Rd

London

Green Banana Marketing shortcut seminar

 

 

 

More >

Posted 22 August 2015 | No comments

10 tips to maximise growth through your website

Many of the social organisations we work with are going through huge changes, using their “ten year strategy” to answer the question “what would a digitally-enabled organisation look like?” and “how will we thrive in an increasingly digital world?”. These are perfect questions to help shape the future and current offering and the following related questions helped us in working through our recent projects with the Fairtrade Foundation and The British Trust for Ornithology (BTO).

blog photo 1blog photo 2   blog photo 3

Mapping the user experience and developing wireframe and related colour schemes for the navigation

1.What’s not working well at the moment? Where are audiences dropping off / not going – why is this?

2.What are your analytics telling you? Do you understand the audience needs and do these change by age / other demographics? Why is that? Do you know how people are using your site?

3.Are you ready for Mobilegeddon? Do start the process of ensuring your site works on different devices from interactive white screen to phones. You probably already know that Google’s search ranking will be affected by how mobile friendly your site it. There is an easy mobile friendly test you can do.

blog photo FT mobile

The mobile experience for teachers using Fairtrade resources

4.Is your SEO / social strategy good enough? Read Google’s guide to SEO, again Google will look harshly at copy that is too small and links that go nowhere. Defining your strategy beforehand (starting with the web copy), will help you prioritise what your main services are.

5. Do you have a strong concept / design? People like ideas- a strong concept can really lift your site usage.

6.Do you have the right sign-up points? Getting the balance right is essential; too many and people will click off your site. Having the main touch points clearly labelled will increase conversion to sales, and to your newsletter sign up.

picture blog news

Clear and interesting sign up points help the user

7.Why not ask people what they would like to use the site for in the future? Regular users of your site will often have as good ideas as anyone for how the experience could be made even better, we’ve found tapping this interest and using some of their ideas is crucial.

8.Are you using it as a living / agile website? Agile roll-outs are best. Too often the process is to map the user experience to a wireframe and then build the site over 10-16 weeks, which is fine. But it’s better to keep the site alive and agile, adding new features and functionality, so the site has a beginning but no end. There is no web 2.2.

9.Are you linking your CRM to your website? You increase conversion to your site by as much as 50% from users on your social channels, by a few simple campaigns.

10.Are you making lots of new friends? We’ve found links to your site from other respected organisations work wonders for new site visitors and increased search ranking.

If you need help with your web delivery, these are the first questions we would ask, it’s an easy checklist, which starts with your audience and builds things in an agile but logical way.

Giles Robertson, Founder and Managing Director of Green Banana Marketing Ltd, Marketing Soc. and RSA Fellow, Charity Group chairman, Trustee of Marine Conservation Society, member of 2Degrees board of advisers and the Sustainability Growth Group. Follow him on twitter @gogreenbanana or email at Giles@greenbananamarketing.com

More >

Posted 9 July 2015 | No comments

Green Banana Marketing news 10th June 2015 – Our successes

 

 

View this email in your browser

Green Banana Marketing news 10th June 2015

Video of the month

Social films have impact



We produced Trouble for Spark Young Filmmakers competition,  which has been entered into film festivals, the client said ”GBM brought creative energy and ideas that helped us maximise the impact of the programme”. Spark is a charity dedicated to changing young people’s lives.

Green&Charity News

Charity sector creative leaders



Highlighting great new charity campaigns in our monthly blog
Acquire the knowledge

Marketing/Event news

Fairtrade Schools launch



We successfully launched FT schools site, with 1,000s of teachers downloading
Building a fair world

More >

Posted 24 June 2015 | No comments

Send all our leaders on the London Marathon

Beach body photo blog

What’s not to like about the London Marathon? It’s welcoming – whether you are one of the 750,000 spectators, watching it on TV or more importantly one of the 38,000 people taking part. It’s pure joy, celebration and carnival– preceded by pain and I guess sometimes despair. What makes the London Marathon brand so special is the following:

  1. we all know somebody who was running
  2. the amazing sense achievement, of giving and taking part
  3. the sense of fun and nothing is impossible or is judged to be ridiculous. The most eccentric charity runner was probably Lloyd Scott who took five days to complete the course wearing a deep-sea diving suit. And no doubt ushered in new regulations for the marathon, which state that the race must be completed in one day
  4. the fact that this is one of the biggest fundraisers, during the last 30 years runners have made more than £500m for various charities

We were also all swept up by 2012 London Olympics and the amazing Gamemakers who really made their mark. Now contrast that with the lead up to the general election – the biggest event we were not really invited to be part of – in the weeks leading up to 7th May.   We’ve not been involved in a conversation with the general election. The environment, sport and health have been little discussed. The Green party lost out, by playing down discussions about green issues, to demonstrate a broader understanding of other policy areas.

There has been very little discussion about sport, health and well being; tackling obesity and getting people back into sports. I applaud the This Girl Can campaign and what Dove has tried to do by normalising every day body shapes. But all this seems to have been given the two fingers by the most pointless and shallow ad of our time; an ad for a weight loss drink and beach perfect bodies.

Thank goodness for two bloggers Tara Costello and Fiona Longmuir, pictured, who posed next to the ad, rightly saying they are beach ready.

I want an election a bit like the London Marathon, where;

  1. we know somebody who is running and want to support them
  2. we feel involved
  3. our differences are celebrated
  4. the health of our bodies and the planet are central to the thinking
More >

Posted 20 May 2015 | No comments

Poldark’s charity is a funder’s dream

I wonder, if like me, you have been inspired by Ross Poldark, in the BBC1’s 70s remake, which has been watched by nearly 7 million viewers, based on Winston Graham’s Poldark books from the 1940s and 1950s.
poldark 1Set in the 18th century, the main character, Ross Poldark, a British Army officer, returns to his home in Cornwall from the American Revolutionary War only to find that his fiancée, Elizabeth, having believed him dead, is about to marry his cousin, Francis Poldark. Ross attempts to restore his own fortunes by reopening one of the family’s tin mines. After several years he marries his servant girl, and is gradually reconciled to the loss of Elizabeth’s love.

There is plenty to enjoy – at its heart, a story of determination and doing the right thing. Poldark’s physique has been much debated, but it’s his approach, which we think throws up some great analogies for charities wanting to stay true to their beliefs and be true leaders. And they are;

1. At his core is a powerful belief in philanthropy, which comes through every pore

2. He has a vision – turning his new tin mine into a success- which he relentless pursues

3. He doesn’t let short term set backs take him of course, but knows when to call in extra help

4. He knows how to lead people with his vision – of finding tin

5. He understands what it takes to inspire people with words as well as actions

6. He’s keenly aware of how to inspire funders

7. He knows how to gain their continued support, and when to give updates on the progress that has been made

8. He’s happy to go out on a limb for what he believes in – in work and in love, however out of kilter and out of fashion this might be with his immediate circle

9. He leads by example and is consistent to his word

10. Despite much adoration, he is humble, welcoming and a genuinely consistent all round nice guy.

Can Ross Poldark do no wrong?

poldark

More >

Posted 1 May 2015 | No comments

Spring 2015 – ten tips for charity marketing growth

Flowers-growing-out-of-the-concrete-photography23

Spring is here!

 

I wanted to write a quick checklist of some of things we’ve been asked to look at with our charity clients, many of whom are consolidating what they are doing with their marketing this year. It doesn’t matter if you are halfway through or at the beginning of your planning cycle, why not run-through this check list?

1. Define where you think the majority of your supporters are on the ‘supporter journey’- take a day out to review where each audience is

2. Challenge your team to generate one piece of comms a month that defines what your cause stands for (and has an insight that only you could use). Maybe that’s where this Halloween inspired idea came from for Doctors of the World?

3. Define the role of your social media and prune channels that’s aren’t working. Who are they for and are they adding any value? Who is responsible for them? Are they reflective of how people interact with you – on ‘broadcast’ or ‘listen’ mode?

4. Celebrate your work and thank your supporters, explain how you spent their money. Here’s a great example from Greenpeace2014 was BIG. Let’s make 2015 even bigger!

5. Run a competition with your supporters for better ways to engage with them. Help for Heroes have amassed a whole A- Z of ideas

6. Why not do a placement at one of your partners, maybe even better do a job swap with say P&G marketing

7. Help find new comms professionals for your Board of Trustees by drawing up a short list of new skills you need (go and meet them and get their advice). Look at WWF, they have a digital expert

8. Make your Trustee board quarterly reporting a useful part of the team reporting process, rather than an add on

9. Look for new commercial opportunities for your charity brand

10. Make sure you write up case studies of all your campaigns and partnership work and get it on your website  (and enter awards)

I do hope you have a good year and please do make the most of it!

flowering plum tree branch

 

More >

Posted 17 April 2015 | No comments

My Charlie Experience: imprinted for a lifetime

my charlie experience

This is about you and me

It’s rare for Green Banana Marketing employees to speak about themselves but we all have some things that we are proud of. Today it is my turn. Julie Heyraud, Account exec. for almost 2 years and French! At Green Banana Marketing I have learnt many things about charities and become aware of all the world’s atrocities through our clients’ work. I’m proud to be part of these projects, to create a ‘better world’.

Adagio for Strings" by Samuel Barber Trafalgar Square 08/01/15 Benjamin Ellin

Adagio for Strings” by Samuel Barber Trafalgar Square 08/01/15 Benjamin Ellin

As you would expect at GBM, we believe everyone should be able to express their own opinions as long as they do not harm others. We are free to talk about politics, religion, cooking!  We like to question, to communicate and discuss green and fair issues.

Last month on the 7th of January, a terrible event touched my country, France, and attacked one of the most important values of our democracy. Twelve people working for Charlie Hebdo, a French satirical magazine, were killed in Paris at their offices. Twelve people like you and I with different religions, beliefs, lives, problems… You may not have heard of the magazine Charlie before, but for context, this publication has always been criticised for its controversial caricatures, which sometimes seems offensive to some. The magazine’s motivation was to be free to publish what they wanted. And this is what they did, which often resulted in death
threats.
Worried about the threat to freedom of speech we have defended for so long, two of my friends and I went straight into the organisation of an unexpected major peaceful demonstration, London’s ‘Je suis Charlie’. On the 7th January more than 1,000 people gathered within three hours in Trafalgar Square, on the 8th we organised a concert which was meant to unite eight musicians but ended up with 150 of the finest classical UK musicians, again, at the same place. On Sunday 11th more than 4,000 people came to Trafalgar Square and on our social page, we gained many photos and comments and Messieurs Nick Clegg and Boris Johnson visited Trafalgar Square as well as Madame Bernman, the French ambassador in the UK.

What does Charlie Hebdo represent?

01-1012.qxp“Charlie” the new Diderot?

I would not go so far. French society has always been recognised, hated and loved for its freedom of speech. This part of any democracy’s foundation has been threatened last month. Charlie Hebdo and its team always worked hard to protect it. Terrorists, who act like this, thankfully are very rare.

The only thing we know is that Charlie decided to publish their ideas, continuing the tradition of joking at everything. Despite that freedom, only 60,000 newspapers were published each week and there were rumours saying that the company was facing financial difficulties.

A very small readership to be any real threat to whoever organised this attack. Clearly, this attack was planned to deliver some kind of message.

Did it work? It only works if you allow it to work.

                                                                                                                                                                               

What happened then?

07.01.15 TrafI had to do something to protect freedom of speech!

Marketing for charities is always fascinating but as we have seen in the past with the Ice bucket challenge, The Teenage Cancer Trust and Stephen Sutton, supporters campaigning on behalf of causes is always more effective; ‘people power’. Driven by passion, personal experience, they are able to move mountains (and be very convincing).

I recognised their feelings when I was in this situation. Those who believe in something want to defend it.

Driven by this passion and the preservation of freedom of speech, I rushed into organising these events.

Organising an event, is to deal with all the unexpected elements. But luckily these ones were very peaceful, uniting people with the same values.

What will happen in the future?

Dessins-hommages-a-Charlie-Hebdo-Philippe-Geluk_max1024x768Professionally, I can confirm the theory, demonstrating the power of supporters and the power of a nation defending their beliefs and values. All actions were in response to 7th of January, they were not only condemning the death of twelve or more people but were defending something much more important, – human rights. Defending, protecting and spreading these values of democracy, people also wish to save others like in Nigeria for example.

Some positives learning have come to me in terms of communication. It was a really good unplanned experience. The power of supporters, the use of social channels like Facebook, the power of online word-of-mouth and the credibility of some personalities, reinforcing your communication (like an embassy).

This experience has shown me that people still value some things; they are still touched and are ready to stand up for what they believe. Here’s a little secret for you, the reader: I am even more convinced about and proud to work with and for charities and charitable causes.

As the Article 19 of the Human Rights declaration states that “Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.”

As you are. And that is the biggest point.

tout est pardonné

Julie Heyraud ‘Je suis Charlie’

More >

Posted 9 March 2015 | No comments

Our next shortcut event improve your website

 

 

Shortcuts Series

Gain more support through your website

 

Free Shortcuts seminar  – Friday 13 March 2015  4pm – 5pm
Green Banana Marketing invite you to their free Shortcuts seminar on Friday 13 March 2015 at 4pm. Come along and hear tips on how to maximise your website and gain more support for your cause, making the most of your online presence through good design, SEO and meta tagging, with examples from British Council, British Trust for Ornithology and Buglife….

 

Previous delegates said of the seminar; “very useful and inspiring – the fundamentals of marketing” 
Aimed at those responsible for building support online,  you will come away with an understanding of: 

   
•  The fundamentals of great website design, appropriate for your audience

•  Ten tips to maximise your website to ensure it is adding value

•  Online tools and techniques, such as SEO and meta tagging, from recent case studies

•  How to address issues and concerns you may have with your online work

We would very much like to see you and a colleague at this Free Shortcuts seminar on Friday 13th March 2015 at 4pm for one hour at 229 Tottenham Court Road, London, W1T7QG.
Places are limited to 20, so please do click here now to subscribe and book your free place.

‘Shortcuts’ seminars are intended to give you the most important information in the one-hour session. Drinks, cakes and a friendly networking session will follow the seminar. 
We look forward to seeing you there!
Kind regards,
Follow us on Twitter
Visit our website
BOOK NOW
Date: 13th March 2015Time: 4 – 5 pmLocation: 02 Workshop229 Tottenham Court RdLondon

Green Banana Marketing shortcut seminar

More >

Posted 25 February 2015 | No comments

The very best charity marketing from 2014

The very best charity marketing from 2014

With so many amazing campaigns, it’s tough selecting the most innovative charity ads of the year. This is encouraging for the charity sector, even though it’s harder and harder for normal people to navigate through the various causes and lend their support.

Charities (and I guess their marketing agencies), have long understood that creating some kind of fame often increases share of mind and this hopefully leads to more support. Charities are often challenged by gaining the resources to support a new campaign. A strong business case helps, and entering the campaign into charity awards can fast track this. The campaign gets profiled in the brochure, 500 marketing folk hear about the charity and better still, if it wins, then profile pieces will be written. The charity may even become the agency’s charity of the year.

First up: NSPCC: ‘The underwear rule’

The underwear rule is a fantastic insight. It is a campaign devised by the NSPCC that provides a simple way to help parents keep their children safe from abuse. It’s simple for both parents and children to understand. This film perfectly captures the right tone and call to action. Well done to NSPCC.

Second place: CRUK ‘Play to cure’

What a great excuse to play a good game, when at the same time you’re helping Cancer Research UK’s scientists identify the DNA faults that could lead to cancer. Well done CRUK – lateral thinking at its best.

Third: Greenpeace ‘Tell Lego to dump Shell’

It’s good to see Greenpeace in action (and succeeding in stopping the Lego Shell partnership!)  Keep up the great campaigning work. Without Greenpeace, life would be much less interesting (and less organisations would be kept in check).

Fourth: Barnardo’s ‘The Nation’s Fridge Door’

Just love Barnardo’s virtual fridge, based on the idea that we all like to share our children’s pictures of robins and pirates, but not all children have parents who care. In every family’s household the fridge door is a symbol of a parent’s pride and support of their children’s achievements. Yet the UK’s most vulnerable children don’t have anyone to give them this support or record their successes.

That’s why Barnardo’s is asking people to turn the support they give their own children into the support for the children who have nobody. The drawings sent in by families were published on their virtual fridge, and a selected few were published in The Guardian and in Barnardo’s stores.

Fifth: Breast Cancer Awareness ‘Fitness Bra Cam’

Breast Cancer Awareness have done so much to change the tone of the issue – brightening it up and making it more accessible. This campaign is a perfect example of this.  In partnership with big companies, who helped them deliver a truly funny (and slightly awkward!) entrapment film!

Some new fame is worth having and these are great examples of charities taking risks but keeping their cause at the heart of the delivery. Well done to all andHappy New year 2015.

Nature-Green-New-Year-Wallpapers-300x200

More >

Posted 12 January 2015 | No comments