Category: Greener Marine

Top ten charity campaigns of 2015

Well done to all those charities who have run bold campaigns in 2015. Not an easy year for the sector with many mergers still on the table, negative stories about about how charities operate in getting their vital funds, the debacle of the Kids Company closing and the Edelman Trust barometer showing trust in charities down 17%.

My top 10 charity campaigns this year are:

Greenpeace Awesome Again

It was good to see Greenpeace’s action in 2014 and mobilising millions to stop the Lego Shell partnership in 2015. Without Greenpeace, life would be much less interesting (and less organisations would be kept in check).

Je Suis Charlie

charlie
Not a charity but certainly a cause, I’m sure most would agree the Je Suis Charlie events were a critical response to the threat against the freedom of speech, inspired by the terrible attacks in France on 7th January 2015.

This Girl Can

I loved This Girl Can campaign developed by Sport England as a celebration of active women doing their thing no matter how well they do it or how they look.

Big Issue Baristas

A very innovative and entrepreneurial way to diversify the work homeless people can do, by training them to make and sell cappuccinos – with eight carts in London, I wish it all the best.

Amnesty’s Virtual Reality ‘Aleppo’ Street

It’s tough bringing home your message and this campaign does just that with specially created headsets. It aims to transport people to a Syrian street to show the destructive effects of barrel bombs.

St John’s Ambulance ‘Chokeables’

st johns

A brilliant idea, using regular ‘chokables’ as the main characters, with voice-overs from Johnny Vegas and David Mitchell, adding weight.

The Lord’s Prayer ad (Just Pray)

lord

The Church of England planned to run the spot before showings of Star Wars: The Force Awakens, opening on 18 December. As an aside, The Odeon, Cineworld and Vue refused to show The Lord’s Prayer ad . The spot launched the Church of England’s justpray.uk website, which encourages prayer and offers tutorials.

I Saw Your Willy / Share Aware

NSPCC’s great campaign encourages children to think about what they share online; with this campaign they have developed a partnership with 02.

Life-changing Learning

open

The Open University has captured the strength of mind, effort and reward that comes from studying a part-time degree – a nice brand builder.

Unicef Snapchat of Nigeria

Unicef recruited Snapchat artists to redraw the pictures made by some of the 800,000 children forced to flee their homes in Nigeria, as part of a campaign to raise awareness of the horrific impact of the Boko Haram crisis on Nigerian children.

These charity campaigns are all brave and ambitious – but more importantly speak to us in a straightforward language, and in my view, increase the perceived value of the charities’ role on the issues. I believe they have every chance of driving new supporters and partnerships.

Wishing you all a great Christmas and New Year.

Giles Robertson, Director of Green Banana Marketing Ltd and independent Marketing Consultant, Marketing Society Fellow, Board Member, Marine Conservation Society

Follow him on twitter @gogreenbanana and Linkedin or email at Giles@greenbananamarketing.com

Shortcuts Stand out from the crowd – need to know brand and marketing essentials

 

Your invitation to Green Banana Marketing’s next Shortcuts event
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Shortcuts Series

Standout from the crowd – need to know brand and marketing essentials

Free Shortcuts seminar – Tuesday 10th September 2015 9 – 10am

Green Banana Marketing invite you to their free Charity Shortcuts seminar on Tuesday 10 September 2015 at 9am.

Charities need good marketing more than ever – with great pressures to gain new supporters (and more charities to standout from), building your appeal and what you stand for is essential.

Having a strong brand and marketing focus has never mattered more.

This innovative hours workshop will change the way you think about marketing and leave you bursting with ideas on how to build your brand personality, standout from the crowd and attract new supporters to your organisation.

Previous delegates said of the seminar; “very useful and inspiring – the fundamentals of marketing”
     

We would very much like to see you and a colleague at this Free Shortcuts seminar on Tuesday 10th September 2015 at 9am for one hour at the O2 Workshop, 229 Tottenham Court Road, London, W1T7QG.

Places are limited to 20, so please do click here now to subscribe and book your free place.


‘Shortcuts’ seminars are intended to give you the most important information in the one-hour session. Drinks, cakes and a friendly networking session will follow the seminar. 

We look forward to seeing you there!

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Date: 10th September 2015Time:

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10 tips to maximise growth through your website

Many of the social organisations we work with are going through huge changes, using their “ten year strategy” to answer the question “what would a digitally-enabled organisation look like?” and “how will we thrive in an increasingly digital world?”. These are perfect questions to help shape the future and current offering and the following related questions helped us in working through our recent projects with the Fairtrade Foundation and The British Trust for Ornithology (BTO).

blog photo 1blog photo 2   blog photo 3

Mapping the user experience and developing wireframe and related colour schemes for the navigation

1.What’s not working well at the moment? Where are audiences dropping off / not going – why is this?

2.What are your analytics telling you? Do you understand the audience needs and do these change by age / other demographics? Why is that? Do you know how people are using your site?

3.Are you ready for Mobilegeddon? Do start the process of ensuring your site works on different devices from interactive white screen to phones. You probably already know that Google’s search ranking will be affected by how mobile friendly your site it. There is an easy mobile friendly test you can do.

blog photo FT mobile

The mobile experience for teachers using Fairtrade resources

4.Is your SEO / social strategy good enough? Read Google’s guide to SEO, again Google will look harshly at copy that is too small and links that go nowhere. Defining your strategy beforehand (starting with the web copy), will help you prioritise what your main services are.

5. Do you have a strong concept / design? People like ideas- a strong concept can really lift your site usage.

6.Do you have the right sign-up points? Getting the balance right is essential; too many and people will click off your site. Having the main touch points clearly labelled will increase conversion to sales, and to your newsletter sign up.

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Clear and interesting sign up points help the user

7.Why not ask people what they would like to use the site for in the future? Regular users of your site will often have as good ideas as anyone for how the experience could be made even better, we’ve found tapping this interest and using some of their ideas is crucial.

8.Are you using it as a living / agile website? Agile roll-outs are best. Too often the process is to map the user experience to a wireframe and then build the site over 10-16 weeks, which is fine. But it’s better to keep the site alive and agile, adding new features and functionality, so the site has a beginning but no end. There is no web 2.2.

9.Are you linking your CRM to your website? You increase conversion to your site by as much as 50% from users on your social channels, by a few simple campaigns.

10.Are you making lots of new friends? We’ve found links to your site from other respected organisations work wonders for new site visitors and increased search ranking.

If you need help with your web delivery, these are the first questions we would ask, it’s an easy checklist, which starts with your audience and builds things in an agile but logical way.

Giles Robertson, Founder and Managing Director of Green Banana Marketing Ltd, Marketing Soc. and RSA Fellow, Charity Group chairman, Trustee of Marine Conservation Society, member of 2Degrees board of advisers and the Sustainability Growth Group. Follow him on twitter @gogreenbanana or email at Giles@greenbananamarketing.com

Happy Christmas from Green Banana Marketing

GBM Christmas card 2014

School’s Green Week & Science week

I am a big fan of schools that take their Science Week or Green Week seriously. As a Trustee of the Marine Conservation Society, I’ve just been into the excellent Lee Common Church School and spoken to them about the marine environment.


I talked to the whole school (well it is only wee with 48 children from reception to year two) about the challenges facing our seas. We also spoke to a slightly bigger group at The Beacon of 450 boys. I am pleased to say that £800 was donated and Lee Common adopted a turtle through MCS.

They asked great questions and were amazed by the scale of things like the Basking Shark (which grows to an amazing 11 metres in length and yet only eats the smallest of things in the sea). We looked at the effects of pollution – and how one lucky seal had a happy ending, which isn’t always the case. Five out of the seven global turtle species come to the UK shores (including the Leatherback, Green, Loggerhead, Hawksbill and Kemp’s Ridley) and often confuse their favourite tea of jellyfish with plastic carrier bags. We saw how similar plastic bags look to jellyfish and the other problems caused by the massive rise in sea litter.

We looked at the abundant sealife with so many surprises including the Cuckoo Wrasse, which changes from a female to a male, causing quite a stir. And the biggest ever

Leatherback washed up in Wales, at ten times the weight of an adult.

We looked at some of the common things we see on our beaches and how it’s good to know a few of these including the seaweed which looks like Lettuce, as we are never further than 70 miles from the sea.

We also considered what inspires us about nature. And how a passionate interest can turn into a lifelong obsession (or even a career, in many cases).

We discussed the importance of well-managed fisheries. With over 85% of fish stocks at their limits, we looked at the fish which should be avoided. And finally we discussed the role of government in protecting our seas – of which only 0.006% are currently protected. And the Marine Conservation Society, who are pushing government to recognise 127 Marine Protected Zones (which would make up 27% of our seas). But this mean old government is only considering 40 of the zones.

I hope our school Science Week and Green Week children go on to be more inspired future leaders and do a better job of protecting our seas.

“Fish are friends”: what surfers could learn from Disney

Animations are lush backdrops of nature; Madagascar and a bunch of tear away lost New York Zoo animals, Finding Nemo and a father searching for his lost son. I love the messages in these films, respecting nature, diversity and rights of passage.
It’s not far from Madagascar on the island of La Réunion in the southern Indian Ocean three surfers have recently been killed by sharks. Allegedly the surfers have turned on the sharks and pressured the government to act, which they have and under duress captured 20 rare sharks for ‘scientific study’. Some surfers claim that other environmentally destructive practices such as commercial fishing are far worse than a few sharks being killed.

However deaths by sharks are not to be belittled, but many many more sharks die each year. You only need to look at the facts presented by PETA’s excellent Free The Sharks Week. From 1580 to 2007 there were 64 deaths from great white shark attacks reported. And last year alone humans killed 73 million sharks, all would have died horrible deaths without their fins, shipped off to make shark’s fin soup.

What makes this war on nature worse is that surfers are role models for nature. Look at Crush the surf dude turtle in Finding Nemo – the coolest character; “Now give me some fin”. Even Bruce the shark knows he needs to change himself and see “Fish as friends, not food”. Hard to believe but the Sharks have been around way longer than dinosaurs and surfers. The surfers of Le Réunion knew the risks. Advised not to surf late in the afternoon when shark’s are active (the two most recent death’s were late afternoon / sunset) and avoid surfing near river mouths – a favoured habitat of sharks. The worst part of this story

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aside from the deaths – is that you would think that surfers would understand the beauty of nature and the harmony man and nature can achieve together.

Maldivian Marine Sanctuary – A Political Distraction?

Newly elected Maldivian President Mohammed Waheed took Rio+20 as an opportunity to announce that by 2017, the Maldives will become the only country to be a marine reserve. The Maldives is well known for its golden sands, stunning marine life and clear blue skies; a true paradise. It is one of the last places in the world you would expect major political unrest. However through January and February in 2012, there were riots on the capital island Malé. The riots led to the resignation of President of Mohamed Nasheed (allegedly at gunpoint) and the induction of a new president Mohammed Waheed. However riots have continued. The announcement by Waheed that the Maldives will become full marine reserve has led to complaints that he has

done this as a distraction from the political issues the Maldives face.

While this may be engineered as a distraction, I welcome the announcement. It will make the Maldives the single largest marine reserve in the world, creating a policy that will only allow eco-friendly and sustainable fishing, protecting a very delicate and valuable ecosystem. This would prevent destructive fishing methods such as purse-seining. Due to the bad press that the Maldives has been receiving surrounding these riots, this news will help to get the tourism industry back on its feet, which is essential as the nation is heavily reliant on tourism as a main source of income.

We would love to see other countries take similar steps towards protecting their valuable marine ecosystems, including the UK. The Marine Conservation Society is currently pushing for 127 carefully selected sites to become Marine Conservation Zones (MPZ) in UK seas, which would allow marine habitats to regenerate after damage due to anthropogenic activities such as destructive fishing methods.

So whether this is a political distraction or not, I believe that this is a great step in securing a future for tourism and sustainable fishing within the Maldives, helping to secure jobs and incomes for the local population.

If you have any opinions or comments on this subject, we would love to hear from you.

 

 

Future of fishing: last chance to save fish stocks

In my capacity as Trustee of the Marine Conservation Society I attended the coalition of the UK’s leading environmental and conservation organisations, including WWF, Greenpeace, RSPB, Marine Conservation Society (MCS), ClientEarth, nef (new economics foundation), and OCEAN2012, response to the UK Government and the publication of the reform proposals. The coalition delivered their joint objectives for the Common Fisheries Policy to key decision-makers at the Zoological Society of London last night. The UK fisheries minister, Richard Benyon MP delivered the government’s response. Fisheries campaigner Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall who led the FishFight campaign, responded in relation to discards.

  • The current proposal fails to:
  • Put the environment first for people’s sake
  • Provide tools to reduce capacity in line with the available resources
  • Make access to resources conditional on social and environmental criteria

The NGOs asked the UK Government to ensure a Common Fisheries Policy that delivers rather than undermines. On behalf of the NGO coalition, Ian Campbell added: “A reformed Common Fisheries Policy must establish a new way to distribute access to fish. Sustainability criteria should be used to rank access to resources, favouring those who employ methods which have the least impact on marine habitats and non-target species, are most selective, most fuel-efficient, and those who can demonstrate strong legal compliance and operate within and contribute to coastal communities.”

The groups said despite some positive measures, such as the commitment to stock recovery by 2015, there were too many shortcomings that if not addressed by Ministers and MEPs, could undermine any chance of meaningful reform. A reformed CFP must:

  • Put the environment first to make sure that fish stocks, the marine environment and fisheries can thrive
  • Set legally binding sustainable fishing levels that cannot be exceeded by law-makers or fishers
  • Eliminate discards
  • Deliver transparent decision-making and reporting processes to measure performance
  • Properly address the issue of overcapacity in the European fleet

Reacting to the Commission’s announcement, UK Fisheries Minister Richard Benyon MP said that his number one priority was eliminating discards and ensuring that the Marine Act overcame the many silos that are associated with fisheries policy and to deliver a reform of the ‘broken’ Common Fisheries Policy (CFP).

Debbie Crockard, Fisheries Policy Officer of the Marine Conservation Society said:

“It is outrageous that we are paying for sound scientific advice to be conducted by world experts, only for it to be disregarded as the baseline for stock management. Scientific advice must be considered the most important driver for sustainable fisheries management.”

The Marine Conservation Society’s new Good Fish Guide launches

As a Trustee of MCS I am pleased to say that the excellent new Good Fish Guide has been launched – with a new print pocket Good Fish Guide here and new website.   A huge amount of work goes into assessing over 150 species and numerous stocks of each fish, drawing on myriad sources of information.  The pocket guide has already been downloaded many times by the public.  Now the work has been done, please do your bit for our seas. Fish are disappearing fast from our seas and you can make a difference by simply making more sustainable choices when buying seafood.

Despite the competition for media this week, there has been some good coverage about MSC new guide:-

Supermarkets criticised for ‘poor and confusing’ fish labelling

The Guardian – ‎May 4, 2011‎

Fish retail labels ‘inadequate’

BBC News – ‎May 4, 2011‎